[Air-l] music 'piracy' groups query

Andrew Whelan amj.whelan at gmail.com
Thu Feb 8 10:44:29 PST 2007


Hi Chris,
Many thanks for these leads, I am vaguely familiar with some Lessig stuff
and the EFF but the rest are new to me (indeed, I didn't know the EFF made
an argument supprting ripping in terms of fair use). I am especially
interested in how 'rippers' relate to the p2p 'masses', as it were, and
therefore I'm as yet undecided on whether or not to contact rip groups
directly - they are anyway notoriously cagey. However, I have amassed a
significant number of group-produced '.nfo' files, a very small number of
which include contact details (usually for IRC channels). I would of course
probably need an 'invite', but may, if needs be, be able to secure one
through p2p contacts.
Thanks again,
Andrew

On 2/8/07, Heidelberg, Chris <Chris.Heidelberg at ssa.gov> wrote:
>
> Andrew:
>
> Good luck! You will have to know someone and have that person vouch for
> you because this has really gone underground thanks to the MPAA and RIAA
> series of international raids and successful lawsuits all over the
> globe. They may think you are a narc, so be careful. However, the RIAA
> and MPAA have plenty of stories, position papers, and releases on these
> groups and how they caught them. The most recent group that I have found
> as an ancillary part of my research for my upcoming defense was in
> Russia. Lessig has written several good books that can give you the
> legal history of technology disruption and intellectual property
> lawsuits. Consider the history of Napster, Morpheus, eDonkey, Limewire
> and more when looking for articles.The lawsuits are interesting too. You
> can actually Google them and it will lead you to articles. I would look
> at Good Morning Silicon Valley which has done a lot of articles and
> commentary on the subject. Look at Lawrence Lessig's website. Also, you
> can try Fisher who wrote the book Promises to Keep on this subject in
> 2004. He's a Harvard researcher.Also look at the software trade group
> site for their positions on piracy.That's how I found some things. Also,
> look at the EFF site. Check out the Electronic Frontier Foundation and
> similar groups are defenders of fair usage through ripping.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: air-l-bounces at listserv.aoir.org
> [mailto:air-l-bounces at listserv.aoir.org] On Behalf Of Andrew Whelan
> Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 10:13 AM
> To: air-l at listserv.aoir.org
> Subject: [Air-l] music 'piracy' groups query
>
> Dear all,
>
> I am researching the groups who 'rip' commercial CDs and vinyl for
> peer-to-peer distribution and wondered if anyone had come across any
> reading on this phenomena. The only article I have been able to find
> addressing this subject specifically is:
>
>
>
> Cooper, Jon, and Daniel Harrison. 2001. "The social organization of
> audio piracy on the Internet." *Media, Culture and Society* vol. 23, no.
> 1, pp.
> 71-89.
>
>
>
> Any suggestions as to material, especially on audio, or film 'rippers',
> or indeed software 'cracker' groups, would be very much appreciated.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Andrew Whelan
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