[Air-l] viewing American class divisions through Facebook and MySpace

Lois Ann Scheidt lscheidt at indiana.edu
Mon Jun 25 05:21:02 PDT 2007


Beyond nationality, preference for IM platforms is also related to when 
the user began using IM's. In other words, lots of old-timers still use 
ICQ for some, if not all, of their conversations because it was the 
platform of choice when they started using peer-to-peer.

It's pretty simple human habit...use what you know and what you learned 
on is the best because it's what you learned to use first.

LOL  How many of us still prefer to listen to the music that was 
popular when we were in high school...no matter how many newer or 
different types of music we enjoy.

Lois Ann Scheidt

Doctoral Student - School of Library and Information Science, Indiana
University, Bloomington IN USA

Adjunct Instructor - School of Informatics, IUPUI, Indianapolis IN USA and
IUPUC, Columbus IN USA

Webpage:  http://www.loisscheidt.com
Blog:  http://www.professional-lurker.com


Quoting Ben Spigel <spigel.1 at osu.edu>:

> In figuring out why some highschools use facebook or myspace, we need
> to remember that up to a few years (maybe even less) ago, facebook was
> college only while myspace was anyone. Because of this, more
> highschoolers were on myspace. Even though facebook is now open to
> anyone with an e-mail address, the myspace 'seed' was already planted.
>
> Another interesting topic relating to this is why different regions or
> countries use different IM protocols. I grew up in the United States,
> where everyone used AOL instant messenger, but when I went to the
> University of Toronto for undergrad, it was an MSN school. However, my
> middle eastern friends depended on ICQ while Yahoo! was popular among
> Asian immigrants.
>
> Ben Spigel
> Graduate Student
> Department of Geography
> The Ohio State University
>
> On 6/24/07, danah boyd <aoir.z3z at danah.org> wrote:
>> A week ago, folks were talking about class divisions around Facebook
>> and MySpace use in teen culture.  I was in the middle of writing an
>> essay about that exact topic(and some folks have heard me speak to
>> this issue over the last few months) so i didn't want to peep up
>> until i had written what i could.  I finally gave up and realized
>> that I didn't have the proper words for talking about this issue so I
>> wrote an essay with caveats.  I offer it to you to tear to shreds in
>> the hopes that maybe some good can come out of it.  (I didn't include
>> the full text here because it's long - i hope the link doesn't
>> discourage folks from checking it out.)  Feedback is *very* welcome.
>>
>> Viewing American class divisions through Facebook and MySpace
>> http://www.danah.org/papers/essays/ClassDivisions.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> [Barry - i disagree with your view that it's just local clustering
>> dependent on a random local seed.  I've seen this in too many schools
>> in too many states in the United States to believe that this isn't
>> about class.  I can't speak to Canada or Britain or anywhere else.  I
>> also can't speak to adult usage.  I'm talking solely about high
>> school teen usage in the US.  If you've got ideas for how to measure
>> this quantitatively when demarcating class is difficult, i'm all ears.]
>>
>>
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