[Air-L] The state of Internet Law

Thomas Jones thomasallenjones at gmail.com
Wed Dec 15 21:41:48 PST 2010


 Internet Law seems to be categorically under the LST umbrella at the Universities most popularly known for teaching it:


http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/degrees/jd/pos/lawscitech/index.html
http://www.law.stanford.edu/program/centers/


Other schools teach this through an Intellectual Property track, Privacy track, and Ive even seen similar structured programs taught in Public Interest programs. Youll also see more "Institute of ..." than actual law tracks. Its a start I think, or at least an acknowledgement of its validity. My concern is the rate of adoption especially given how rapid the digital domain grows.


I think that the holistic nature of the Internet encompassing parts of so many areas makes it more of a generality, and likely more properly, or correctly categorized under said umbrella.


I would not dismiss the feasibility that, as noted in an earlier email, Internet Law is in itself an entirety of law practiced today in a different domain. If we think about it nearly every aspect of "face-to-face" law applies within the "cyber" domain, but interpreted in accordance with its appropriate context. 


I think this perspective is intellectually curious, and I would love to read more about how traditional law has, and has not applied, different or otherwise, to the digital domain. 


FYI - I try not to use "cyber" too often - its a term that is often used when sensationalizing or fear mongering (ie cyberwar). 

-- 
Thomas Jones
http://www.TheOtherTomJones.com
http://twitter.com/OtherTomJones
http://www.linkedin.com/in/TheOtherTomJones


One should guard against preaching to young people success in the customary form as the main aim in life. The most important motive for work in school and in life is pleasure in work, pleasure in its result, and the knowledge of the value of the result to the community.
-- Albert Einstein, On Education --





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On Thursday, December 16, 2010 at 12:18 AM, Michael Zimmer wrote:

> From my experience, few law schools have formalized "tracks". Many have centers or institutes that focus on particular areas. Along with the schools you list, NYLS and Santa Clara come to mind as additional schools with robust information law / tech law centers. 
> 
> I'm also curious as to your designation of "Law, Science and Technology" as equivalent to "Internet or Cyber Law", as the former seems to be much more inclusive of legal issues beyond simply those related to the Internet. These don't seem like one-to-one homonyms to me.... Have you seen them used interchangeably?
> 
> Best,
> Michael.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Michael Zimmer, PhD
> Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies
> Director, BS in Information Science & Technology Program
> Associate, Center for Information Policy Research
> University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
> e: zimmerm at uwm.edu
> w: www.michaelzimmer.org
> 
> 
> On Dec 15, 2010, at 9:50 PM, Thomas Jones wrote:
> 
> 
> >  In the US there are only a handful of law schools teaching Law, Science, and Technology tracks - otherwise known as Internet or Cyber Law. Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Columbia, and a few others have such a program or similar thereto. 
> > 
> > 
> >  Most other law schools only offer a class or two in what is a young and vibrant area of law, especially in light of the recent Wikileaks escapade.
> > 
> > 
> >  Do any of you have any insight into other Law Schools that have, or are planning to have a Law, Science, and Technology Law track within their Law School? (Yes, Im looking for candidate law schools to apply to as well) :-)
> > 
> > 
> >  Do you think this is an area that is being ignored or dismissed as a legitimate niche?
> > 
> > 
> >  Please discuss!
> > 
> > 
> >  -- 
> >  Thomas Jones
> > http://www.TheOtherTomJones.com
> > http://twitter.com/OtherTomJones
> > http://www.linkedin.com/in/TheOtherTomJones
> > 
> > 
> >  One should guard against preaching to young people success in the customary form as the main aim in life. The most important motive for work in school and in life is pleasure in work, pleasure in its result, and the knowledge of the value of the result to the community.
> >  -- Albert Einstein, On Education --
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >  Sent with Sparrow
> > 
> >  _______________________________________________
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> >  is provided by the Association of Internet Researchers http://aoir.org
> >  Subscribe, change options or unsubscribe at: http://listserv.aoir.org/listinfo.cgi/air-l-aoir.org
> > 
> >  Join the Association of Internet Researchers:
> > http://www.aoir.org/
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> 
> 




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